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Rhino, 2012, document of live performance. Courtesy of the artist. Venue: Seoul Art Space – Mullae, Seoul, Korea. Photo: Maru. Video: Lee Seonyoung.Taipei.



Rhino, 2012, document of live performance. Courtesy of the artist. Venue: Seoul Art Space – Mullae, Seoul, Korea. Photo: Maru. Video: Lee Seonyoung.Taipei.



Rhino, 2012, document of live performance. Courtesy of the artist. Venue: Seoul Art Space – Mullae, Seoul, Korea. Photo: Maru. Video: Lee Seonyoung.



Rhino, 2012, document of live performance. Courtesy of the artist. Venue: Seoul Art Space – Mullae, Seoul, Korea. Photo: Maru. Video: Lee Seonyoung.



Rhino, 2012, document of live performance. Courtesy of the artist. Venue: Seoul Art Space – Mullae, Seoul, Korea. Photo: Maru. Video: Lee Seonyoung.



Rhino, 2012, document of live performance. Courtesy of the artist. Venue: Seoul Art Space – Mullae, Seoul, Korea. Photo: Maru. Video: Lee Seonyoung.




YEH Tzu-Chi

The Eighth Genre: Performance & Live Art/Multimedia-Installation & Performance



In 2011, I recorded three videos of animals at the Zoo of Chongqing: happy panda, a mother lion who couldn't be with her cubs in the same cage sticked to the fence to guard them, and a rhino who walked in circles on the ground where there were two circles made by it after so many years of walking. A local visitor left the comment "pathetic" in Chongqing dialect, which fully expressed my feelings toward the animals. The juxtaposition of the three videos is almost a work of art and can be regarded as the animal's performance. One year later, I had an opportunity to turn the videos into a live performance art in the Pan Asia Performance Art Network event. I imitated the rhino walking/crawling on the ground in a circle. By walking/crawling nakedly in the parallel space and time, I contemplate whether it is appropriate to confine animals at zoos, and while discussing animal rights I also convey a sense of redemption.



Profile

Yeh Tzu-Chi was born in Taipei in 1961 and moved to Tainan in the mid-1980s. Graduated from the Department of Foreign Languages of National Taiwan University and the Institute of Western Languages and Literature of Tamkang University. She has worked as an editor, lecturer, freelance translator and writer before she turns to performance art in 2002. Her creative inspiration comes from life experience and observation.

Her works have a wide range of subjects, diverse forms, and unlimited venues. They can be described as timebased art and poverty art composed of simple ready-made materials, the body, process and environment. She has been invited to 22 countries to participate international performance art activities. In 2003, she founded“ArTrend Performance Group” to promote the development of performance art in Taiwan.